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lich-tung:

latticelight:

The Sculpture of Chöying Dorjé, Tenth Karmapa
Fig. 8.35: TārāProduction of an atelier of Chöying Dorjé (1604-1674) or a later copyYunnan Province, China, or Tibet; 17th century or laterBrassHeight: 7 3⁄4 in. (19.8 cm)
Rubin Museum of Art C2005.16.3(HAR 65425)


//

lich-tung:

latticelight:

The Sculpture of Chöying Dorjé, Tenth Karmapa

Fig. 8.35: Tārā
Production of an atelier of Chöying Dorjé (1604-1674) or a later copy
Yunnan Province, China, or Tibet; 17th century or later
Brass
Height: 7 3⁄4 in. (19.8 cm)

Rubin Museum of Art C2005.16.3
(HAR 65425)

(via fishstickmonkey)

fishstickmonkey:




Sheep’s Head



Turkey or northwestern Iran, 19th century
Sculpture
Brass, pierced, encised, gilded.
9 1/8 x 13 3/8 in. (23 x 34 cm)
LACMA

fishstickmonkey:

Sheep’s Head

Turkey or northwestern Iran, 19th century

Sculpture
Brass, pierced, encised, gilded.
9 1/8 x 13 3/8 in. (23 x 34 cm)
archaicwonder:

Urartian Bronze Votive Plaque, c. 8th-7th century BC
Of hammered sheet bronze, probably depicting the storm god, Teisheba, enthroned wearing a long cloak and sun disc crown, holding three thunderbolts in his left hand, a bull seated beneath the throne, before him four worshipers, wearing fringed cloaks, hands raised in supplication, various items in the field including rayed sun, crescent moon, calf head, eyes and winged sun disc, with four attachment holes.
Teisheba of Kumenu was the Araratian (Urartian) weather-god, notably the god of storms and thunder. He was also sometimes the god of war. He formed part of a triad along with Khaldi and Shivini. The ancient Araratian cities of Teyseba and Teishebaini were named after Teisheba. He is a counterpart to the Assyrian god Adad, and the Hurrian god, Teshub. He was often depicted as a man standing on a bull, holding a handful of thunderbolts.

archaicwonder:

Urartian Bronze Votive Plaque, c. 8th-7th century BC

Of hammered sheet bronze, probably depicting the storm god, Teisheba, enthroned wearing a long cloak and sun disc crown, holding three thunderbolts in his left hand, a bull seated beneath the throne, before him four worshipers, wearing fringed cloaks, hands raised in supplication, various items in the field including rayed sun, crescent moon, calf head, eyes and winged sun disc, with four attachment holes.

Teisheba of Kumenu was the Araratian (Urartian) weather-god, notably the god of storms and thunder. He was also sometimes the god of war. He formed part of a triad along with Khaldi and Shivini. The ancient Araratian cities of Teyseba and Teishebaini were named after Teisheba. He is a counterpart to the Assyrian god Adad, and the Hurrian god, Teshub. He was often depicted as a man standing on a bull, holding a handful of thunderbolts.

(Source: christies.com, via leradr)

peashooter85:

Extremely ornate flintlock pistol with ivory stock originating from St. Etienne, France, mid 18th century.  Crafted in the style of ivory stocked pistols from Maastricht during the 17th century.

Sold at Auction: $18,000 Euro

(Source: hermann-historica.de, via fishstickmonkey)

in-the-horniman:

This is a ghost trap from Tibet. The trap is also known as a Namkhar, which means sky in Tibetan. The trap serves many purposes, not just the protection from ghosts. 

in-the-horniman:

This is a ghost trap from Tibet. The trap is also known as a Namkhar, which means sky in Tibetan. The trap serves many purposes, not just the protection from ghosts. 

(via bestiario)

fishstickmonkey:

Bowl with a Depiction of Lion Hunting   Gold; chased.  Scythian Culture. Early 4th century BC  Solokha Barrow. Entrance Grave, Dnieper Area, Zaporozhye Region  Russia (now Ukraine)
State Hermitage Museum

fishstickmonkey:

Bowl with a Depiction of Lion Hunting
Gold; chased.
Scythian Culture. Early 4th century BC
Solokha Barrow. Entrance Grave, Dnieper Area, Zaporozhye Region
Russia (now Ukraine)

State Hermitage Museum

thegetty:

The Roman god of beginnings looks both ways, over past and future.
Janus-head flask, 1st century A.D., eastern Mediterranean. The J. Paul Getty Museum

thegetty:

The Roman god of beginnings looks both ways, over past and future.

Janus-head flask, 1st century A.D., eastern Mediterranean. The J. Paul Getty Museum

(via leradr)

fishstickmonkey:

Plaque with Scythian Warriors   Gold; repousse. 14x19 cm  Scythian Culture. 4th century BC  Geremes Barrow, Dnieper Area, the Village of Geremyasov, Zaporozhye Region  Russia (now Ukraine)  Source of Entry:   Imperial Archaeological Commission, St Petersburg. After 1859
State Hermitage Museum

fishstickmonkey:

Plaque with Scythian Warriors
Gold; repousse. 14x19 cm
Scythian Culture. 4th century BC
Geremes Barrow, Dnieper Area, the Village of Geremyasov, Zaporozhye Region
Russia (now Ukraine)
Source of Entry:   Imperial Archaeological Commission, St Petersburg. After 1859

State Hermitage Museum

ancientpeoples:

Bronze figure of charioteer 
This is one of the earliest representations of the notherns people who lived on the notherns borders of China. 
Chinese, Eastern Zhou dynasty, 475-220 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum 

ancientpeoples:

Bronze figure of charioteer 

This is one of the earliest representations of the notherns people who lived on the notherns borders of China. 

Chinese, Eastern Zhou dynasty, 475-220 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum 

ancientpeoples:

Lamp made of bronze, inlaid with gold and silver
c.206 BC - AD 200
Han Dynasty
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Lamp made of bronze, inlaid with gold and silver

c.206 BC - AD 200

Han Dynasty

(Source: The British Museum)

workman:

mini-girlz:
A GREEK TERRACOTTA 
APHRODITE HELLENISTIC PERIOD
CIRCA 3RD CENTURY B.C.

workman:

mini-girlz:

A GREEK TERRACOTTA

APHRODITE HELLENISTIC PERIOD

CIRCA 3RD CENTURY B.C.

(via alloftime)

manticoreimaginary:

Ceramic Squat Oinochoe Greece, Corinth, 590-570 B.C. Height: 21.59 cm

manticoreimaginary:

Ceramic Squat Oinochoe
Greece, Corinth, 590-570 B.C.
Height: 21.59 cm

(Source: collections.lacma.org, via focus-damnit)

timur-i-lang:

Tile. Takht-i Sulayman, Iran, 14th century. Il-khanid period.
"In the Islamic world, ceramics makers emphasized brightly colored glazes and intricate designs to animate relatively simple shapes and architectural tiles. Drawing on a variety of decorative sources, they continually expanded and refined their repertoire of calligraphic, abstract, and figurative motifs. Some of the designs, such as the soaring phoenix on this fourteenth-century turquoise molded tile, reflect Iran’s contacts with other artistic traditions, in particular China. Such “exotic” motifs became an integral part of the Persian visual language and were skillfully adapted to satisfy local taste and aesthetic preferences."

timur-i-lang:

Tile. Takht-i Sulayman, Iran, 14th century. Il-khanid period.

"In the Islamic world, ceramics makers emphasized brightly colored glazes and intricate designs to animate relatively simple shapes and architectural tiles. Drawing on a variety of decorative sources, they continually expanded and refined their repertoire of calligraphic, abstract, and figurative motifs. Some of the designs, such as the soaring phoenix on this fourteenth-century turquoise molded tile, reflect Iran’s contacts with other artistic traditions, in particular China. Such “exotic” motifs became an integral part of the Persian visual language and were skillfully adapted to satisfy local taste and aesthetic preferences."

(via thegiftsoflife)

omgthatartifact:

Shaman’s Tambourine
Shor (Siberia, Kemerovo)
The Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography
"A tambourine has a complex cosmological symbolic meaning that originates from the archaic beliefs of the peoples of northern Asia about the structure of the Universe. In this system of beliefs, the he-deer embodied the celestial sphere and the sun, and the she-deer embodied the middle world. This is vividly expressed in the painting that covers the outer surface of the tambourine and depicts the three spheres of the Universe: the upper sphere is filled with images of anthropomorphous spirits, animals and birds of the upper world, the middle part is represented by a horizontal line with “grids”, and the lower part contains fish and reptiles that embody the lower world. In the shaman mythology, a tambourine implied the image of a mythical deer, the main helper-spirit of a shaman and his draft animal that he rode to travel to other worlds. This tambourine was often used in shaman rituals aimed at a family’s well-being and easy childbirth."

omgthatartifact:

Shaman’s Tambourine

Shor (Siberia, Kemerovo)

The Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography

"A tambourine has a complex cosmological symbolic meaning that originates from the archaic beliefs of the peoples of northern Asia about the structure of the Universe. In this system of beliefs, the he-deer embodied the celestial sphere and the sun, and the she-deer embodied the middle world. This is vividly expressed in the painting that covers the outer surface of the tambourine and depicts the three spheres of the Universe: the upper sphere is filled with images of anthropomorphous spirits, animals and birds of the upper world, the middle part is represented by a horizontal line with “grids”, and the lower part contains fish and reptiles that embody the lower world. In the shaman mythology, a tambourine implied the image of a mythical deer, the main helper-spirit of a shaman and his draft animal that he rode to travel to other worlds. This tambourine was often used in shaman rituals aimed at a family’s well-being and easy childbirth."

(via leradr)

larameeee:

Inscribed with the names King Akhenaten (Father to King Tutankhamun) & Queen Nefertiti — 1353-1336 BCE — Egypt — Metropolitan Museum of Art

larameeee:

Inscribed with the names King Akhenaten (Father to King Tutankhamun) & Queen Nefertiti — 1353-1336 BCE — Egypt — Metropolitan Museum of Art

(via ffactory)

lich-tung:

latticelight:

The Sculpture of Chöying Dorjé, Tenth Karmapa
Fig. 8.35: TārāProduction of an atelier of Chöying Dorjé (1604-1674) or a later copyYunnan Province, China, or Tibet; 17th century or laterBrassHeight: 7 3⁄4 in. (19.8 cm)
Rubin Museum of Art C2005.16.3(HAR 65425)


//

lich-tung:

latticelight:

The Sculpture of Chöying Dorjé, Tenth Karmapa

Fig. 8.35: Tārā
Production of an atelier of Chöying Dorjé (1604-1674) or a later copy
Yunnan Province, China, or Tibet; 17th century or later
Brass
Height: 7 3⁄4 in. (19.8 cm)

Rubin Museum of Art C2005.16.3
(HAR 65425)

(via fishstickmonkey)

fishstickmonkey:




Sheep’s Head



Turkey or northwestern Iran, 19th century
Sculpture
Brass, pierced, encised, gilded.
9 1/8 x 13 3/8 in. (23 x 34 cm)
LACMA

fishstickmonkey:

Sheep’s Head

Turkey or northwestern Iran, 19th century

Sculpture
Brass, pierced, encised, gilded.
9 1/8 x 13 3/8 in. (23 x 34 cm)
archaicwonder:

Urartian Bronze Votive Plaque, c. 8th-7th century BC
Of hammered sheet bronze, probably depicting the storm god, Teisheba, enthroned wearing a long cloak and sun disc crown, holding three thunderbolts in his left hand, a bull seated beneath the throne, before him four worshipers, wearing fringed cloaks, hands raised in supplication, various items in the field including rayed sun, crescent moon, calf head, eyes and winged sun disc, with four attachment holes.
Teisheba of Kumenu was the Araratian (Urartian) weather-god, notably the god of storms and thunder. He was also sometimes the god of war. He formed part of a triad along with Khaldi and Shivini. The ancient Araratian cities of Teyseba and Teishebaini were named after Teisheba. He is a counterpart to the Assyrian god Adad, and the Hurrian god, Teshub. He was often depicted as a man standing on a bull, holding a handful of thunderbolts.

archaicwonder:

Urartian Bronze Votive Plaque, c. 8th-7th century BC

Of hammered sheet bronze, probably depicting the storm god, Teisheba, enthroned wearing a long cloak and sun disc crown, holding three thunderbolts in his left hand, a bull seated beneath the throne, before him four worshipers, wearing fringed cloaks, hands raised in supplication, various items in the field including rayed sun, crescent moon, calf head, eyes and winged sun disc, with four attachment holes.

Teisheba of Kumenu was the Araratian (Urartian) weather-god, notably the god of storms and thunder. He was also sometimes the god of war. He formed part of a triad along with Khaldi and Shivini. The ancient Araratian cities of Teyseba and Teishebaini were named after Teisheba. He is a counterpart to the Assyrian god Adad, and the Hurrian god, Teshub. He was often depicted as a man standing on a bull, holding a handful of thunderbolts.

(Source: christies.com, via leradr)

peashooter85:

Extremely ornate flintlock pistol with ivory stock originating from St. Etienne, France, mid 18th century.  Crafted in the style of ivory stocked pistols from Maastricht during the 17th century.

Sold at Auction: $18,000 Euro

(Source: hermann-historica.de, via fishstickmonkey)

in-the-horniman:

This is a ghost trap from Tibet. The trap is also known as a Namkhar, which means sky in Tibetan. The trap serves many purposes, not just the protection from ghosts. 

in-the-horniman:

This is a ghost trap from Tibet. The trap is also known as a Namkhar, which means sky in Tibetan. The trap serves many purposes, not just the protection from ghosts. 

(via bestiario)

fishstickmonkey:

Bowl with a Depiction of Lion Hunting   Gold; chased.  Scythian Culture. Early 4th century BC  Solokha Barrow. Entrance Grave, Dnieper Area, Zaporozhye Region  Russia (now Ukraine)
State Hermitage Museum

fishstickmonkey:

Bowl with a Depiction of Lion Hunting
Gold; chased.
Scythian Culture. Early 4th century BC
Solokha Barrow. Entrance Grave, Dnieper Area, Zaporozhye Region
Russia (now Ukraine)

State Hermitage Museum

thegetty:

The Roman god of beginnings looks both ways, over past and future.
Janus-head flask, 1st century A.D., eastern Mediterranean. The J. Paul Getty Museum

thegetty:

The Roman god of beginnings looks both ways, over past and future.

Janus-head flask, 1st century A.D., eastern Mediterranean. The J. Paul Getty Museum

(via leradr)

fishstickmonkey:

Plaque with Scythian Warriors   Gold; repousse. 14x19 cm  Scythian Culture. 4th century BC  Geremes Barrow, Dnieper Area, the Village of Geremyasov, Zaporozhye Region  Russia (now Ukraine)  Source of Entry:   Imperial Archaeological Commission, St Petersburg. After 1859
State Hermitage Museum

fishstickmonkey:

Plaque with Scythian Warriors
Gold; repousse. 14x19 cm
Scythian Culture. 4th century BC
Geremes Barrow, Dnieper Area, the Village of Geremyasov, Zaporozhye Region
Russia (now Ukraine)
Source of Entry:   Imperial Archaeological Commission, St Petersburg. After 1859

State Hermitage Museum

ancientpeoples:

Bronze figure of charioteer 
This is one of the earliest representations of the notherns people who lived on the notherns borders of China. 
Chinese, Eastern Zhou dynasty, 475-220 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum 

ancientpeoples:

Bronze figure of charioteer 

This is one of the earliest representations of the notherns people who lived on the notherns borders of China. 

Chinese, Eastern Zhou dynasty, 475-220 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum 

ancientpeoples:

Lamp made of bronze, inlaid with gold and silver
c.206 BC - AD 200
Han Dynasty
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Lamp made of bronze, inlaid with gold and silver

c.206 BC - AD 200

Han Dynasty

(Source: The British Museum)

workman:

mini-girlz:
A GREEK TERRACOTTA 
APHRODITE HELLENISTIC PERIOD
CIRCA 3RD CENTURY B.C.

workman:

mini-girlz:

A GREEK TERRACOTTA

APHRODITE HELLENISTIC PERIOD

CIRCA 3RD CENTURY B.C.

(via alloftime)

manticoreimaginary:

Ceramic Squat Oinochoe Greece, Corinth, 590-570 B.C. Height: 21.59 cm

manticoreimaginary:

Ceramic Squat Oinochoe
Greece, Corinth, 590-570 B.C.
Height: 21.59 cm

(Source: collections.lacma.org, via focus-damnit)

timur-i-lang:

Tile. Takht-i Sulayman, Iran, 14th century. Il-khanid period.
"In the Islamic world, ceramics makers emphasized brightly colored glazes and intricate designs to animate relatively simple shapes and architectural tiles. Drawing on a variety of decorative sources, they continually expanded and refined their repertoire of calligraphic, abstract, and figurative motifs. Some of the designs, such as the soaring phoenix on this fourteenth-century turquoise molded tile, reflect Iran’s contacts with other artistic traditions, in particular China. Such “exotic” motifs became an integral part of the Persian visual language and were skillfully adapted to satisfy local taste and aesthetic preferences."

timur-i-lang:

Tile. Takht-i Sulayman, Iran, 14th century. Il-khanid period.

"In the Islamic world, ceramics makers emphasized brightly colored glazes and intricate designs to animate relatively simple shapes and architectural tiles. Drawing on a variety of decorative sources, they continually expanded and refined their repertoire of calligraphic, abstract, and figurative motifs. Some of the designs, such as the soaring phoenix on this fourteenth-century turquoise molded tile, reflect Iran’s contacts with other artistic traditions, in particular China. Such “exotic” motifs became an integral part of the Persian visual language and were skillfully adapted to satisfy local taste and aesthetic preferences."

(via thegiftsoflife)

omgthatartifact:

Shaman’s Tambourine
Shor (Siberia, Kemerovo)
The Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography
"A tambourine has a complex cosmological symbolic meaning that originates from the archaic beliefs of the peoples of northern Asia about the structure of the Universe. In this system of beliefs, the he-deer embodied the celestial sphere and the sun, and the she-deer embodied the middle world. This is vividly expressed in the painting that covers the outer surface of the tambourine and depicts the three spheres of the Universe: the upper sphere is filled with images of anthropomorphous spirits, animals and birds of the upper world, the middle part is represented by a horizontal line with “grids”, and the lower part contains fish and reptiles that embody the lower world. In the shaman mythology, a tambourine implied the image of a mythical deer, the main helper-spirit of a shaman and his draft animal that he rode to travel to other worlds. This tambourine was often used in shaman rituals aimed at a family’s well-being and easy childbirth."

omgthatartifact:

Shaman’s Tambourine

Shor (Siberia, Kemerovo)

The Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography

"A tambourine has a complex cosmological symbolic meaning that originates from the archaic beliefs of the peoples of northern Asia about the structure of the Universe. In this system of beliefs, the he-deer embodied the celestial sphere and the sun, and the she-deer embodied the middle world. This is vividly expressed in the painting that covers the outer surface of the tambourine and depicts the three spheres of the Universe: the upper sphere is filled with images of anthropomorphous spirits, animals and birds of the upper world, the middle part is represented by a horizontal line with “grids”, and the lower part contains fish and reptiles that embody the lower world. In the shaman mythology, a tambourine implied the image of a mythical deer, the main helper-spirit of a shaman and his draft animal that he rode to travel to other worlds. This tambourine was often used in shaman rituals aimed at a family’s well-being and easy childbirth."

(via leradr)

larameeee:

Inscribed with the names King Akhenaten (Father to King Tutankhamun) & Queen Nefertiti — 1353-1336 BCE — Egypt — Metropolitan Museum of Art

larameeee:

Inscribed with the names King Akhenaten (Father to King Tutankhamun) & Queen Nefertiti — 1353-1336 BCE — Egypt — Metropolitan Museum of Art

(via ffactory)

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