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ancientpeoples:

Imperial Eagle
Late Roman
4th-5th Century AD
A rare example of the gem-carver’s art is this lapis lazuli eagle, possibly the finial (top) of an imperial scepter. Lapis enjoyed great popularity in the late Roman and Early Byzantine periods as its rich purple-blue color was associated with royalty. From the 3rd century on, the emperor, often appears on coins and medallions carrying an eagle scepter, emblem of victory and authority.
Source: The Walters Art Museum

ancientpeoples:

Imperial Eagle

Late Roman

4th-5th Century AD

A rare example of the gem-carver’s art is this lapis lazuli eagle, possibly the finial (top) of an imperial scepter. Lapis enjoyed great popularity in the late Roman and Early Byzantine periods as its rich purple-blue color was associated with royalty. From the 3rd century on, the emperor, often appears on coins and medallions carrying an eagle scepter, emblem of victory and authority.

Source: The Walters Art Museum

(via leradr)

ancientpeoples:

Limestone dove 
Part of a larger statue (a hand is still visible on the back of the dove). It is 13cm by 8.3cm by 12.1 cm (5 1/8 x 3 1/4 x 4 3/4 inch,.) 
Cypriot, Hellenistic Period, 3rd - 1st century BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Limestone dove 

Part of a larger statue (a hand is still visible on the back of the dove). It is 13cm by 8.3cm by 12.1 cm (5 1/8 x 3 1/4 x 4 3/4 inch,.) 

Cypriot, Hellenistic Period, 3rd - 1st century BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

(via leradr)

ancientpeoples:

Faience amulet of a frog
Hellenistic Period, maybe Egyptian 
3rd - 1st century BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Faience amulet of a frog

Hellenistic Period, maybe Egyptian 

3rd - 1st century BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

(via leradr)

aleyma:


Hinge, made in Germany in the 15th century (source).

aleyma:

image

Hinge, made in Germany in the 15th century (source).

(via renaissance-art)

from89:

The beauty of science and art are embodied in what’s known as the astronomical compendium, a multipurpose, all-in-one instrument that carries numerous devices for telling the time and performing astronomical calculations. Many astronomical compendia, such as the ones housed at the Museo Galileo in Florence, Italy, were constructed in German lands in the 16th and 17th centuries. 

You Can Also Find Me -:

Skumar’s :- Twitter | Facebook | We Heart It | Pinterest | Subscribe

Other Blog :- India Incredible | Facebook

(via staceythinx)

ancientart:

Etruscan strainers at the MET.

All the shown examples date to the 6th-5th centuries BCE and are made of bronze. Strainers were were used at symposiums (drinking parties) to strain the wine or additives mixed into it.

The strainer shown in the first image is one of the most elaborate, and best-preserved, Etruscan strainer handles found to date. The MET provides the following description of this artefact:

The artist has skillfully presented a complex subject on a very small scale in the openwork square just below the handle’s attachment point. Two nude boxers appear to have just finished a bout in which one man has been knocked to his knees. Their trainer or referee holds his arms up to indicate the end of the round. On the underside of the attachment point is a delicately modeled doe lying on a wave-crest border. The handle’s base depicts a bearded male figure with fish-like legs that terminate in bearded snake heads. The strange legs form a perfect circular opening that allowed the patera to be hung when not in use. The sea monster, almost like a merman, may have been intended to ward off evil.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections12.160.834.11.814.105.365.11.122.139.1711.212.2.

didoofcarthage:

Vase with Erotes and acanthus (and detail)

South Italian, Hellenistic Period, 225-200 B.C.

terracotta 

Walters Art Museum 

(Source: art.thewalters.org, via leradr)

virtual-artifacts:

Votive Stele with Buddha and Bodhisattvas
Period: Northern Qi dynasty
Date: mid- 6th century
Culture: China
Medium: Limestone with pigment and gilding

virtual-artifacts:

Votive Stele with Buddha and Bodhisattvas

Period: Northern Qi dynasty

Date: mid- 6th century

Culture: China

Medium: Limestone with pigment and gilding

azidahaka:

"Amulet with a Lamashtu demon"Date: ca. early 1st millennium B.C.Geography: Mesopotamia or IranMedium: ObsidianDimensions: 2.26 x 1.83 in. (5.74 x 4.65 cm)

azidahaka:

"Amulet with a Lamashtu demon"

Date: ca. early 1st millennium B.C.
Geography: Mesopotamia or Iran
Medium: Obsidian
Dimensions: 2.26 x 1.83 in. (5.74 x 4.65 cm)

(Source: metmuseum.org, via leradr)

centuriespast:

Plaque with pharaonic figures flanking a sacred tree
Period:Neo-AssyrianDate:ca. 9th–8th century B.C.Geography:Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu)Culture:AssyrianMedium:IvoryThe Metropolitan Muaseum

centuriespast:

Plaque with pharaonic figures flanking a sacred tree

Period:Neo-AssyrianDate:ca. 9th–8th century B.C.Geography:Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu)Culture:AssyrianMedium:Ivory
The Metropolitan Muaseum

(via leradr)

riley-da-red:

Guatemalan Incense Burner, ca. 4th-7th century 

riley-da-red:

Guatemalan Incense Burner, ca. 4th-7th century 

(Source: the-oceanid, via leradr)

massarrah:

Ivory Plaque of a Sphinx from Nimrud
This ivory plaque depicts a human-headed sphinx with wings and an conical cap. One of the forepaws sits atop a lotus bud, while the other is perched on a sacred Tree. Although this object was found at Fort Shalmaneser in Nimrud, it is Phoenician in origin.  (Source)
Nimrud, c. 9th-7th centuries BCE.
British Museum.

massarrah:

Ivory Plaque of a Sphinx from Nimrud

This ivory plaque depicts a human-headed sphinx with wings and an conical cap. One of the forepaws sits atop a lotus bud, while the other is perched on a sacred Tree. Although this object was found at Fort Shalmaneser in Nimrud, it is Phoenician in origin.  (Source)

Nimrud, c. 9th-7th centuries BCE.

British Museum.

(via leradr)

amphitrite-aphrodite:

Terracotta lekanis with lid and finial / Hellenistic Greek / 3rd century B.C.

amphitrite-aphrodite:

Terracotta lekanis with lid and finial / Hellenistic Greek / 3rd century B.C.

(via virtual-artifacts)

collective-history:

Bulla with Daedalus and Icarus ca. 5th century BC
A “bulla” is a hollow pendant, that could hold perfume or a charm. Found inside this one was “labdanum,” a substance used in perfume. Depicted are the mythical craftsman Daedalus and his son, Icarus (on the back). To escape captivity, Daedalus fabricated wings for himself and his son, but Icarus flew too close to the sun, and when the heat melted the wax that held his wings together, he fell to his death.

collective-history:

Bulla with Daedalus and Icarus ca. 5th century BC

A “bulla” is a hollow pendant, that could hold perfume or a charm. Found inside this one was “labdanum,” a substance used in perfume. Depicted are the mythical craftsman Daedalus and his son, Icarus (on the back). To escape captivity, Daedalus fabricated wings for himself and his son, but Icarus flew too close to the sun, and when the heat melted the wax that held his wings together, he fell to his death.

(via leradr)

ancientpeoples:

Imperial Eagle
Late Roman
4th-5th Century AD
A rare example of the gem-carver’s art is this lapis lazuli eagle, possibly the finial (top) of an imperial scepter. Lapis enjoyed great popularity in the late Roman and Early Byzantine periods as its rich purple-blue color was associated with royalty. From the 3rd century on, the emperor, often appears on coins and medallions carrying an eagle scepter, emblem of victory and authority.
Source: The Walters Art Museum

ancientpeoples:

Imperial Eagle

Late Roman

4th-5th Century AD

A rare example of the gem-carver’s art is this lapis lazuli eagle, possibly the finial (top) of an imperial scepter. Lapis enjoyed great popularity in the late Roman and Early Byzantine periods as its rich purple-blue color was associated with royalty. From the 3rd century on, the emperor, often appears on coins and medallions carrying an eagle scepter, emblem of victory and authority.

Source: The Walters Art Museum

(via leradr)

ancientpeoples:

Limestone dove 
Part of a larger statue (a hand is still visible on the back of the dove). It is 13cm by 8.3cm by 12.1 cm (5 1/8 x 3 1/4 x 4 3/4 inch,.) 
Cypriot, Hellenistic Period, 3rd - 1st century BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Limestone dove 

Part of a larger statue (a hand is still visible on the back of the dove). It is 13cm by 8.3cm by 12.1 cm (5 1/8 x 3 1/4 x 4 3/4 inch,.) 

Cypriot, Hellenistic Period, 3rd - 1st century BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

(via leradr)

ancientpeoples:

Faience amulet of a frog
Hellenistic Period, maybe Egyptian 
3rd - 1st century BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Faience amulet of a frog

Hellenistic Period, maybe Egyptian 

3rd - 1st century BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

(via leradr)

aleyma:


Hinge, made in Germany in the 15th century (source).

aleyma:

image

Hinge, made in Germany in the 15th century (source).

(via renaissance-art)

from89:

The beauty of science and art are embodied in what’s known as the astronomical compendium, a multipurpose, all-in-one instrument that carries numerous devices for telling the time and performing astronomical calculations. Many astronomical compendia, such as the ones housed at the Museo Galileo in Florence, Italy, were constructed in German lands in the 16th and 17th centuries. 

You Can Also Find Me -:

Skumar’s :- Twitter | Facebook | We Heart It | Pinterest | Subscribe

Other Blog :- India Incredible | Facebook

(via staceythinx)

ancientart:

Etruscan strainers at the MET.

All the shown examples date to the 6th-5th centuries BCE and are made of bronze. Strainers were were used at symposiums (drinking parties) to strain the wine or additives mixed into it.

The strainer shown in the first image is one of the most elaborate, and best-preserved, Etruscan strainer handles found to date. The MET provides the following description of this artefact:

The artist has skillfully presented a complex subject on a very small scale in the openwork square just below the handle’s attachment point. Two nude boxers appear to have just finished a bout in which one man has been knocked to his knees. Their trainer or referee holds his arms up to indicate the end of the round. On the underside of the attachment point is a delicately modeled doe lying on a wave-crest border. The handle’s base depicts a bearded male figure with fish-like legs that terminate in bearded snake heads. The strange legs form a perfect circular opening that allowed the patera to be hung when not in use. The sea monster, almost like a merman, may have been intended to ward off evil.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections12.160.834.11.814.105.365.11.122.139.1711.212.2.

didoofcarthage:

Vase with Erotes and acanthus (and detail)

South Italian, Hellenistic Period, 225-200 B.C.

terracotta 

Walters Art Museum 

(Source: art.thewalters.org, via leradr)

virtual-artifacts:

Votive Stele with Buddha and Bodhisattvas
Period: Northern Qi dynasty
Date: mid- 6th century
Culture: China
Medium: Limestone with pigment and gilding

virtual-artifacts:

Votive Stele with Buddha and Bodhisattvas

Period: Northern Qi dynasty

Date: mid- 6th century

Culture: China

Medium: Limestone with pigment and gilding

virtual-artifacts:

Funerary Urn, Mexico, Oaxaca, Zapotec Culture

virtual-artifacts:

Funerary Urn, Mexico, Oaxaca, Zapotec Culture

(via virtual-artifacts)

azidahaka:

"Amulet with a Lamashtu demon"Date: ca. early 1st millennium B.C.Geography: Mesopotamia or IranMedium: ObsidianDimensions: 2.26 x 1.83 in. (5.74 x 4.65 cm)

azidahaka:

"Amulet with a Lamashtu demon"

Date: ca. early 1st millennium B.C.
Geography: Mesopotamia or Iran
Medium: Obsidian
Dimensions: 2.26 x 1.83 in. (5.74 x 4.65 cm)

(Source: metmuseum.org, via leradr)

centuriespast:

Plaque with pharaonic figures flanking a sacred tree
Period:Neo-AssyrianDate:ca. 9th–8th century B.C.Geography:Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu)Culture:AssyrianMedium:IvoryThe Metropolitan Muaseum

centuriespast:

Plaque with pharaonic figures flanking a sacred tree

Period:Neo-AssyrianDate:ca. 9th–8th century B.C.Geography:Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu)Culture:AssyrianMedium:Ivory
The Metropolitan Muaseum

(via leradr)

riley-da-red:

Guatemalan Incense Burner, ca. 4th-7th century 

riley-da-red:

Guatemalan Incense Burner, ca. 4th-7th century 

(Source: the-oceanid, via leradr)

massarrah:

Ivory Plaque of a Sphinx from Nimrud
This ivory plaque depicts a human-headed sphinx with wings and an conical cap. One of the forepaws sits atop a lotus bud, while the other is perched on a sacred Tree. Although this object was found at Fort Shalmaneser in Nimrud, it is Phoenician in origin.  (Source)
Nimrud, c. 9th-7th centuries BCE.
British Museum.

massarrah:

Ivory Plaque of a Sphinx from Nimrud

This ivory plaque depicts a human-headed sphinx with wings and an conical cap. One of the forepaws sits atop a lotus bud, while the other is perched on a sacred Tree. Although this object was found at Fort Shalmaneser in Nimrud, it is Phoenician in origin.  (Source)

Nimrud, c. 9th-7th centuries BCE.

British Museum.

(via leradr)

amphitrite-aphrodite:

Terracotta lekanis with lid and finial / Hellenistic Greek / 3rd century B.C.

amphitrite-aphrodite:

Terracotta lekanis with lid and finial / Hellenistic Greek / 3rd century B.C.

(via virtual-artifacts)

collective-history:

Bulla with Daedalus and Icarus ca. 5th century BC
A “bulla” is a hollow pendant, that could hold perfume or a charm. Found inside this one was “labdanum,” a substance used in perfume. Depicted are the mythical craftsman Daedalus and his son, Icarus (on the back). To escape captivity, Daedalus fabricated wings for himself and his son, but Icarus flew too close to the sun, and when the heat melted the wax that held his wings together, he fell to his death.

collective-history:

Bulla with Daedalus and Icarus ca. 5th century BC

A “bulla” is a hollow pendant, that could hold perfume or a charm. Found inside this one was “labdanum,” a substance used in perfume. Depicted are the mythical craftsman Daedalus and his son, Icarus (on the back). To escape captivity, Daedalus fabricated wings for himself and his son, but Icarus flew too close to the sun, and when the heat melted the wax that held his wings together, he fell to his death.

(via leradr)

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